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The Ubiquity

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City Life or Town Life?

Picture by Cody Wilson

Picture by Cody Wilson

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Here in the AV, many of us are envious of the glamorous and affluent lifestyle people have in our neighboring city, Los Angeles. If given the chance, many would not hesitate to move to this prominent destination and enjoy the buzzing nightlife or high-end shops. This mindset exemplifies the positive connotation that society has created regarding city life. Though the wonders of city life are alluring, there are many aspects of our very own town lifestyle which are easy to overlook. In fact, if closely analyzed, it may come as a surprise that the benefits of living in towns do outweigh those of living in cities.

There are many cases people make as to why those who live in large cities tend to be more favored. For one, there are more opportunities available, meaning that it is easier to engage in activities that pertain to one’s interests. As stated by The Guardian, “The entire world is (almost) at your doorstep.” A strong case has also been made that people are more acquainted with the realities of life if they explore all of the different parts of a city. From the red-light seedy districts to the extravagant restaurant complexes, there is so much for one to learn through experience. Most importantly, there are many who highlight that the glamour of cities cannot be replicated.   

Despite these claims, town life still has more reasons to be advantageous. The primary factor to consider is the fact that the environment in towns is more healthy and tranquil. People are less inclined to live busy lifestyles, therefore resulting in more positive views of life. Not only that, but leisurely activities and get-togethers are very frequent. Pollution is also a factor that is not much of an issue in towns. The lack of population and of concentrated energy allows for the average citizen to inhale more healthy air, so there is less of a worry for health problems. This makes even more sense when considering that the exposure to the outdoors on average is almost three times as much in towns as in cities.

Studies have also pointed to the fact that people feel a sense of belonging in smaller settlements. Instead of viewing themselves as one among a million, people feel as though they are part of a genuine community. In every neighborhood shop, school building, and marketplace, there is a sense of familiarity, and statements like “Good morning” or “Hello, how are you?” become more substantive. Heather Long, a woman who lived in the suburbs her whole life, commented on this, stating, “Throughout my life, I felt like a queen. I was sincerely greeted by everyone and I got special perks such as discounts at stores or free tickets to local carnivals…”

In towns, people can also be entirely at ease without being self-conscious about their personal identity. There is no need for one to mask who they really are, as people sincerely value diversity in character. Further, peer pressure is not nearly as common. This allows for less awkward and more personal social interactions to occur among individuals with different characteristics.

Finally, an easily-neglected but crucial aspect of life in towns is the low cost of living. There is less expenditure on groceries, food, and transportation, allowing for greater cuts on monthly budgets. In an article by The Guardian, Heather Long explained, “You have to actively try to spend more than $20.00 on a meal, even a good one … A movie still costs single digits … and a real house with multiple bedrooms, bathrooms, and a garage can be bought for under $200,000 dollars.” As a result of greater savings, people in towns have more money to spend and are less likely to live on a stringent budget. This is psychologically and economically important.

Overall, these are just some of the many merits of a town lifestyle. There are so many aspects of the Antelope Valley which we take for granted and overlook in our desires to live better lives. Though these ambitions to achieve more should exist, we must also value and take advantage of what we have. Only then can we really live blissfully.

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The student news site of Quartz Hill High School
City Life or Town Life?