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New MOAH Exhibit: Peace On Earth

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New MOAH Exhibit: Peace On Earth

Picture by Tyler Sinness

Picture by Tyler Sinness

Picture by Tyler Sinness

By Tyler Sinness, Staff Writer

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Everybody knows and loves the Lancaster Museum of Art and History (MOAH). Teenagers flock to take pictures in front of neon art, mothers take their children to the young artist workshops, and Quartz Hill High School consistently rents the space to host its annual Winter Ball. Housed in what seems to be the only modern building in the Antelope Valley, MOAH is the only major art museum in the region. Last Saturday, the museum opened its newest exhibit, entitled “Peace On Earth.”

The exhibit follows the theme of previous exhibits in its selection of modern art, largely created by local Southern California artists. Bright neons, geometric paintings, and thought-provoking sculptures are a staple at the MOAH; but this time, the exhibit set out to emphasize the art world’s role in environmental conservation. Every piece in the new exhibit relates to conservation and has a strong focus on the animal kingdom. Emily Ding’s “Growing Pains,” for example, features a rabbit drawn in colored pencil, while Zachary Mendoza’s “Bury the Hatchet” depicts monkeys attacking a frightened man yielding a hatchet.

Shanti Davis, a student at Quartz Hill High School, attended the exhibit opening. Her favorite piece was “Migrations” by Cynthia Minet: a light-up sculpture made entirely of plastic, depicting a pelican with two plastic bottles tethered around its beak. Minet, as Davis states, “goes around the world volunteering to clean beaches, and she uses the trash to make really beautiful pieces,” making the sculpture all the more impactful than it was at its surface. “It brought tasteful light to the active approach artists can take to combat pollution and environmental issues,” said Davis. When asked about the crowd at the opening, Davis replied: “I saw a lot of people from our generation come out and support as well as retired art professors my mom hadn’t seen in years. It was really encouraging to see the arts bring our community together like that.” The opening show is not simply for artists and culturists, it is a community gathering in celebration of yet another collection of art. Students interested in becoming artists are encouraged to attend the events as well, along with the many well-connected artists who are sure to attend.

The MOAH celebrates the culture of the Antelope Valley while simultaneously presenting interesting pieces of art that are sure to entertain. Whether you need an idea for a date, someplace to take visiting relatives, or a museum to stimulate your mind, be sure to visit the MOAH and its newest exhibit, “Peace On Earth.”

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New MOAH Exhibit: Peace On Earth